Criminal Justice Reform And The California Election

Whether you're a Republican, a Democrat, a Libertarian or none of the above - your vote matters. In California, state propositions concerning plastic bags, marijuana, income taxes, education and the death penalty are all on the ballot, and they affect your life and your community. 

We all deserve to have our voices heard - and the day to exercise this right is November 8th!

We all deserve to have our voices heard - and the day to exercise this right is November 8th!

Voting is the cornerstone of democracy, and it's your platform, as a citizen, to have your voice heard.  This election season, the ballot asks you to vote YES or NO on a handful of propositions

A ballot measure (or Proposition) is a piece of proposed legislation to be approved or rejected by eligible voters.

Our team and our work is vested in helping inmates transcend their situations, and pursuing criminal justice reform. Of particular interest to us in this effort is Prop. 57.

PROP. 57: CRIMINAL SENTENCES, PAROLES AND JUVENILE CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS AND SENTENCING.

Proposition 57 would include more oversight in the sentencing of juvenile offenders.

Proposition 57 would include more oversight in the sentencing of juvenile offenders.

As supported by California Governor Jerry Brown (D), California public safety leaders and victims of crime, Proposition 57 aims to focus incarceration on the most dangerous and violent offenders by requiring Judges to oversee the sentencing of minors and creating avenues for "less dangerous" offenders who have demonstrated rehabilitation to be released on parole under supervision. 

Some are concerned about which inmates would qualify as nonviolent under Prop. 57.

Some are concerned about which inmates would qualify as nonviolent under Prop. 57.

1. Voting YES on Prop. 57 would support parole consideration for nonviolent offenders who have served the full sentence for their primary offense. It also allows inmates to earn credits for good behavior, education milestones and rehabilitation. Currently, prisoners are eligible for parole once they've served the minimum sentence - so, for example, if a person is sentenced to 5-10 years, then their parole eligibility is built into the sentence at the 5 year mark. However, it is important to remember that prisoners have no legal rights during a parole hearing - it is considered to be a privilege, not a right.

The state of the death penalty in California has been a long term topic of debate.

The state of the death penalty in California has been a long term topic of debate.

Unsure of WHERE to vote? Check out this handy tool to find your closest polling place!